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child custody Archives

Providing stability for children after a divorce

Georgia parents who are divorced will need to continue working with their exes to raise their children. This can get complicated when there are two households that have completely different rules. By keeping the best interests of their children at heart, however, parents can provide stability, order, constancy and structure during an otherwise chaotic time.

How shared parenting can benefit children, parents

Georgia parents who are getting a divorce might want to consider shared parenting as a custody option. In around 80 percent of cases, mothers still get custody, but this can be a poor arrangement for the mothers, the fathers and the children. In a shared parenting arrangement, a child spends equal or nearly equal time with each parent.

Survey results shows more involved fathers

Georgia fathers may be spending more time with their children than in past decades based on a survey by Pew Research Center. The survey found that fathers spent an average of seven hours on child care weekly in 2015. This is almost three times higher than in 1965, but it is still less than half the average amount of time that mothers spend on the same task.

More immigrant families considering guardians for children

Some Georgia families might be concerned about how their children will be affected if their undocumented parents are deported from the country. With a crackdown on immigration happening under the Trump administration, some families are taking steps to ensure that they have appointed relatives or other loved ones as guardians of their children in the event that they are deported.

The rise in shared parenting

Georgia fathers may be at a disadvantage in getting custody of their children in a divorce. In more than 80 percent of cases around the country, mothers get physical custody. However, fathers may want to push for shared parenting. This is an arrangement in which the child spends approximately the same amount of time with each parent, and it is growing in popularity.

How nesting may ease children's adjustment to a divorce

Georgia parents who are ending their marriage might be considering joint custody. This is a growing trend with divorced parents as studies increasingly show that children fare better when they spend a significant amount of time with each parent. This builds a stronger relationship between parent and child, but it also means that children's lives are disrupted as they must move back and forth between their parents' homes. As a result, some parents are trying an arrangement called nesting.

Dealing with custody disputes and substance abuse

When one Georgia parent is dealing with drug or alcohol abuse, the other parent may be worried about their children's safety when they are around that parent. Child custody can get tricky in these situations as the court may get involved very quickly if a parent complains about the other parent's substance abuse.

Planning ahead for vacations

The summertime can cause headaches for Georgia parents who are divorced and who want to take their children on vacations. There are several things that they can do to reduce the likelihood of custody disputes arising because of their vacation plans.

Reasons to ask for child custody changes

Some Georgia parents who are subject to an existing child custody order may want to ask for a modification. This may be done in the event that they think that the child may be in danger. If a child is in immediate danger, a judge may order a modification right away. A modification may also be made if children say that they don't want to live with the custodial parent.

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At Hecht Family Law we understand that this is not only a very trying time for you, but that you want to get what you feel you deserve during the divorce process. We will always keep your end goal in mind.

Ready to rest easy tonight? Take a moment to contact Hecht Family Law. We offer free phone consultations, or you could send us an email to discuss your family law matter today.

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